Carpal Tunnel Release
With Ultrasound Guidance

Carpal tunnel release with ultrasound guidance allows direct visualization of the carpal tunnel through the skin without the need to cut through the palm.

Carpal tunnel release with ultrasound guidance is a less-invasive treatment option for people suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome.

What is it?

Carpal tunnel release with ultrasound guidance is a minimally-invasive procedure for individuals who suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome. Traditionally, carpal tunnel releases have been performed in an open or endoscopic fashion – which requires the surgeon to cut through the palm of the skin to visualize the carpal tunnel. Carpal tunnel release with ultrasound guidance allows direct visualization of the carpal tunnel through the skin without the need to cut through the palm. Carpal tunnel release with ultrasound guidance does not require any postoperative immobilization and most often patients have immediate motion after the procedure and is covered by most insurances.

How does it work?

Carpal tunnel release with ultrasound guidance uses an ultralow-profile microknife device (SX-One MicroKnife®) that enables the transverse carpal ligament to be cut through a single four millimeter incision in the wrist. A diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound is used at the initial office visit to see if the patient is a candidate for the procedure. Once the patient has been deemed a candidate for the procedure, the patient will be referred to have an Electromyography (EMG). An EMG will test the nerves and muscles in the wrist and hand and will provide an assessment of how diseased or damaged the nerve is in the palm.

What does it treat?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is the second most common type of musculoskeletal surgery, with well over 300,000 procedures performed annually. It results in an average of 25 days lost among all work related injuries and affects millions of people each year. The most common indications for carpal tunnel syndrome are numbness and tingling in the fingers or the hand, shock-like sensations in the palm and the wrist, fingers falling asleep, losing dexterity in the fingers and potentially dropping things, waking up at night time needing to shake the hand out, and wrist pain.




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